Play&SingPlay&Sing

Play&SingPlay&Sing

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Playing and Singing for the Recovering Brain: Efficacy of Enriched Social-Motivational Musical Interventions in Stroke RehabilitationPlaying and Singing for the Recovering Brain: Efficacy of Enriched Social-Motivational Musical Interventions in Stroke Rehabilitation

A Project coordinated by IIIA.

Principal investigator:

Josep Lluís ArcosJosep Lluís Arcos

Team members:

Collaborating organisations:

Idibell, University of Helsinki

Idibell, University of Helsinki

Funding entity:

Fundació "La Marató de TV3"Fundació "La Marató de TV3"

Funding call:

Project #:

201729.31201729.31

Funding amount:

0,00€0,00€

Duration:

2018-08-012018-08-01

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2021-07-312021-07-31

A large percentage of chronic stroke patients (CS) show motor deficits and language impairments. These deficits clearly diminish their health-related quality of life, limiting their socio-familiar and working roles. Because their high incidence, one of the greatest social and economic challenges is to develop cost-efficient, easily and widely applicable rehabilitation tools. In this context, music has arisen as a potential neurorehabilitation tool. Two important applications have been proposed: (i) the use of music training to induce motor recovery (Music supported therapy, MST) and (ii) singing-based interventions for language recovery in aphasic patients. Some of their limitations are the intensive and time-consuming requirements and the lack of solid evidence from Randomized Control trials (RCT).

A large percentage of chronic stroke patients (CS) show motor deficits and language impairments. These deficits clearly diminish their health-related quality of life, limiting their socio-familiar and working roles. Because their high incidence, one of the greatest social and economic challenges is to develop cost-efficient, easily and widely applicable rehabilitation tools. In this context, music has arisen as a potential neurorehabilitation tool. Two important applications have been proposed: (i) the use of music training to induce motor recovery (Music supported therapy, MST) and (ii) singing-based interventions for language recovery in aphasic patients. Some of their limitations are the intensive and time-consuming requirements and the lack of solid evidence from Randomized Control trials (RCT).

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